Helpful Hints for Prospective Instructors

Successful Course Descriptions

Well written course descriptions mean more registrations!

Your title and course description should be simple, interesting and clear. Here are some aspects to consider:
  • Think about your audience and write to them!
  • Keep in mind what potential students already know or feel about your topic.
  • Anticipate and answer questions they may have about the topic.
  • If you have a particular philosophy or orientation, express it clearly.
  • Tell potential students why they should take the course, as well as what and how they are going to learn.
  • Don't condescend to your audience, but don't assume they possess specialized knowledge.
  • When appropriate, use your biographical description to illustrate your expertise and encourage registration.

The Title

Keep it simple and catchy; complex titles tend to confuse, and cute titles can be misleading.

Your Course Description

Be specific as to what you will cover, but vague enough for flexibility. Don't promise what you cannot deliver and deliver what you have promised. Your participants are interested in benefits and outcomes.

Your opening line is critical. It must convey the essence of your program. Avoid the phrase, In this session.... Try a first sentence using:
  • An Outstanding Fact - "Ninety percent of all Americans are afraid of public speaking."
  • Importance of the Topic - "Without appropriate self-publicity or promotion, the vast majority of writers go unnoticed."
  • End Result - "You will learn why Adobe PageMaker is one of the most popular page layout programs on the market."
  • Catchy or Offbeat; Generating Interest - "Do you feel like you need an interpreter when you talk to your spouse, child or boss?"

Make every word count! Your description should be between 60-100 words. Use complete sentences with action verbs, e.g., discover, acquire, or accelerate. Be direct! Use short sentences to convey your message. Keep your description concise. We do reserve the right to edit.
Last Update: April 09 2009
For additional information, contact: Stephen Campiglio